Amp tinkerers and people who aren't afraid of 700 volts or so in here....

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BY TmcB
#738289
Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo.

Anyway, because I can't ever leave any gear alone ever in my whole life, I'm wanting to make a new baffle for my '68 Custom Deluxe Reverb to take two 10 inch speakers,
something like this:

Image

The idea is to make it a mini Vibrolux.

Any tips or advice? (Or desire to render services?)

I am totes noob when it comes to woodworking.
#738299
Use the best ply you can find (marine is the bomb). Check the grading as lower grade ply has solid faces but shitty insides which will vibrate and dick with the air pressure in the cab. Then it's literally just drilling the holes to mount the speakers.
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BY Cdog
#738308
YouTube. I watched a cool series by 'Uncle Doug' that went through the whole process of scratch building a combo. Id recommend using thin (2-3mm) thick offset strip around the edge of the baffle under the grill to keep it from vibrating against the baffle during your chugging riffs.
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BY Bg
#738310
Whats in there at present? 1x12? the good thing is you can use the existing baffle as a pattern. As far as woodworking is concerned, you could ask bunnings/mitre10 to rip your plywood to the correct size, then you just need to mark out the holes and cut them out with a jigsaw. You definitely want some spacers between the baffle and cloth - just a piece of 6mmx20mm round the edge and down the centre. I like to use thinner ply on fender style cabs - maybe 8-10mm max as part of the tone comes from the flexing. Keep the bigger stuff for marshall/boogie style cabs.

Dampen the cloth before you fit it - it'll tighten up when it dries. Use a staple gun to staple the overlapped cloth on the back etc... You can get the captive nuts from mitre10, these will be going on the front of the baffle - behind the cloth - and are pulled into the wood when you tighten the screws. So remember to paint them black else they stand out like dogs balls.
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BY TmcB
#738320
Bg wrote:Whats in there at present? 1x12? the good thing is you can use the existing baffle as a pattern. As far as woodworking is concerned, you could ask bunnings/mitre10 to rip your plywood to the correct size, then you just need to mark out the holes and cut them out with a jigsaw. You definitely want some spacers between the baffle and cloth - just a piece of 6mmx20mm round the edge and down the centre. I like to use thinner ply on fender style cabs - maybe 8-10mm max as part of the tone comes from the flexing. Keep the bigger stuff for marshall/boogie style cabs.

Dampen the cloth before you fit it - it'll tighten up when it dries. Use a staple gun to staple the overlapped cloth on the back etc... You can get the captive nuts from mitre10, these will be going on the front of the baffle - behind the cloth - and are pulled into the wood when you tighten the screws. So remember to paint them black else they stand out like dogs balls.

Magic, thanks Beeg!
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BY Bg
#738321
give me a shout if you get stuck finding nuts, I might have a few spare lying around - think I had a box full at one point. Oh and don't forget to paint the baffle black, after you've cut the speaker holes....
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BY Reg18
#739036
Rather than start a new thread thought I'd piggy back on this one, about to get underway building a 1x12 and was going to go traditional Fender style floating baffle (screws at top and bottom) but am reconsidering now as I've read it cuts a bit of bass.
The 1x12 is at this stage going to be used with a Tweed style amp but I'd like it universal enough that if I want to put a Marshall or something else through it, it's going to still sound great.
Does it make much difference?
The last cab I made it was screwed in on all sides and it sounded great with pretty much any amp I tried through it but maybe a Fender floating baffle wouldn't make any noticeably difference?